How to Take a Sensory Break for Kids

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Picture a symphony of sensations, a whirlwind of stimuli, and a young mind trying to understand everything. Welcome to the world of a child experiencing sensory overload. It’s a common challenge that can be managed with the right strategies. Enter sensory breaks for kids. This blog post will guide you, the caregiver, through understanding sensory overload, the concept of sensory breaks, and how to implement them effectively. We also have a Goal Mine class video for your kids to watch and learn from. Let’s get started!

StepsDescription
Identify the NeedRecognize when your child is showing signs of sensory overload. This could be through changes in behavior, mood, or physical responses.
Choose an ActivitySelect an activity that your child enjoys and that helps them calm down. This could be anything from a quick game of catch to a few minutes of quiet reading.
Set a Time LimitSensory breaks should be short and focused. Aim for around 5-15 minutes, depending on your child’s needs.
Provide GuidanceInitially, your child may need help understanding what to do during a sensory break. Be there to guide them, but encourage independence as they become more comfortable with the process.
Return to ActivitiesOnce the break is over, help your child transition back to their previous activity. This can be eased with a simple routine or transition phrase.

Step 1: Understanding Sensory Overload

Sensory overload occurs when kids receive more input from their senses than they can comfortably process. This can lead to feelings of stress, anxiety, and confusion. But how can you recognize sensory overload? Look for signs such as covering ears, avoiding touch, or becoming overly fidgety. Understanding this concept is the first step towards managing it.

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Step 2: What is a Sensory Break?

A sensory break is a short period during which a child can engage in an activity that helps them regulate their sensory input. It’s like a pit stop in a race, a moment to refuel and recharge before continuing the journey. Sensory breaks can be as simple as a quick stretch or as involved as a few minutes of deep-pressure activities. The key is to find what works best for your child.

sensory breaks for kids. two girls are playing with a cooking set together.
Read more: What Does Sensory Overload Feel Like for Someone With ADHD?

Step 3: How to Take a Sensory Break

Now that we’ve established a sensory break let’s delve into how to take one. Here are some steps to follow:

  1. Identify the Need: The first step is to recognize when your child is showing signs of sensory overload. This could be through changes in behavior, mood, or physical responses.
  2. Choose an Activity: Next, select an activity that your child enjoys and that helps them calm down. This could be anything from a quick game of catch to a few minutes of quiet reading.
  3. Set a Time Limit: Sensory breaks should be short and focused. Aim for 5-15 minutes, depending on your child’s needs.
  4. Provide Guidance: Initially, your child may need help understanding what to do during a sensory break. Be there to guide them, but encourage independence as they become more comfortable with the process.
  5. Return to Activities: Once the break is over, help your child transition back to their previous activity. This can be eased with a simple routine or transition phrase.

Remember, sensory breaks are not a one-size-fits-all solution. They should be tailored to your child’s individual needs and preferences.

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Life can be a sensory symphony for kids; sometimes, the volume gets too high. That’s where sensory breaks come in. These small moments of respite can make a world of difference in helping your child navigate their sensory experiences. Implementing sensory breaks for kids might seem challenging initially. Still, with a little understanding and a dash of patience, you’ll soon become a maestro of sensory management. And remember, our Goal Mine class video is a great resource for your child to learn these skills independently. For a deeper dive into sensory breaks and other life skills, consider getting Goally’s dedicated Tablet to unlock the rest of our video lessons. Together, we can turn the symphony of sensations into a harmonious melody.


FAQ’s About Sensory Breaks for Kids

What are sensory breaks for kids?
Sensory breaks are short periods of time when a child engages in an activity that helps them regulate their sensory input, reducing feelings of stress and overload.

How can Goally help with sensory breaks for kids?
Goally provides step-by-step video classes that guide kids through sensory breaks, helping them understand and manage sensory overload effectively.

How often should kids take sensory breaks?
The frequency of sensory breaks can vary based on individual needs, but generally, a short break every 1-2 hours can be beneficial.

What activities are good for sensory breaks for kids?
Activities for sensory breaks can range from quiet reading to physical activities like jumping jacks or stretching, depending on what the child finds calming.

Can sensory breaks for kids improve focus and behavior?
Yes, regular sensory breaks can help kids manage sensory overload, leading to improved focus, behavior, and overall well-being.
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